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Article TitleWhat are false claims made by separatists for total independence?
BriefIn order to gain credibility, and in order to make sure that separatist leaders are not simply using the good intentions of separatists as a stepping stone to "get into power", I have tried to identify what appear to be false narratives that have been put out by separatist leaders and groups, especially with regard to the US.
ContentsMYTHBUSTING FALSE NARRATIVES PUT OUT BY SOME SEPARATIST LEADERS, AND GROUPS

In order to gain credibility, and in order to make sure that separatist leaders are not simply using the good intentions of separatists as a stepping stone to "get into power", I have tried to identify what appear to be false narratives that have been put out by separatist leaders and groups, especially with regard to the US.

1. "We are not landlocked"

Definition of "landlocked": enclosed by land and having no navigable route to the sea. Alberta IS landlocked.

2. "Once we are independent, we will be able to reach coasts, with the help of the UN."

The UN convention for landlocked states does not guarantee rights for PIPELINES or GASLINES. Also, the UN does not have means of enforcing the convention, even with regard to regular MOBILE forms of transit, such as cars, trucks, trains, pack animals. The convention is NOT enforceable, plus it does not grant any inherent rights to put in pipelines, or gas lines, on foreign soil.

3. "If BC does not allow us to build a pipeline, then we will blockade all their traffic!"

Actually, according to international law, an independent Alberta would not have a right to build a pipeline on foreign soil. But, Alberta would be expected to allow for free mobile forms of transit to pass through Alberta.

Beyond that, truckers used to drive from BC, down through the US, and then up to Winnipeg, because the Canadian roads were so bad.

So, if Canada needs help, the US would have good reason to help Canada, while an "independent Alberta" might just give itself a black eye in front of the international community. Trying to blockade traffic, while being landlocked, is probably not a good idea.

4. "We do not need the US."

Alberta is economically dependent upon the US, for trade. And, the vast bulk of the trade is petroleum related.

In 2018, Alberta exported over $130 billion dollars of products to the US. In 2019, Alberta exported over $100 billion dollars worth of products to the US. During some years, the US has purchased close to 90% of everything produced, by Alberta.

The USA is Alberta's NUMBER ONE TRADING PARTNER.
To say that the US is "not needed" is to say that the number one source of income is not needed.

Not many people would be willing to give up their way of life, and watch Alberta economically crater, simply to wave a new flag. Food on the table is important, too!

5. "We can make deals with other countries."

The primary product sold by Alberta is petroleum. Currently, the lack of pipelines within Canada, even to the US, presents a problem in getting the product to market.

In order to make deals with other countries, there must be a way to get the product - oil - to wherever it needs to go.

6. "We can build our own military."

Because the militaries of the US and Canada are so well integrated, North America has been a relatively peaceful, and stable, place, for more than a century. The integration of the two nations has been developing for over 100 years.

Attempting to insert a third party with a military in the middle of peaceful, stable relations, while the third party (Alberta) is potentially hostile to the first party (Canada) could lead to the destabilization of North America, within a few generations.

In fact, during the Quebec referendum, the US showed extreme reluctance to even consider the results of the referendum. And, it was pointed out that there might not be any place for Quebec, in the midst of US-Canadian relations.

The US might not support an "unholy love triangle" in North America, if there is a perceived risk of eventual conflict between the other two parties.

Also, the US would never want to wind up in a position where sides must be taken. It could lead to the destabilization of North America.

Thus, both Canada and the US could block or hinder Alberta from ever creating a military, as has happened to other countries, in the world, for the sake of peace. This would explain the extreme reluctance on the part of the US, in even considering recognizing Quebec's bid for "sovereignty". It could led the unraveling of a hundred years of careful work, and planning, with Canada.

7. "The US will deal with us, because it is a better deal."

While the US government may not be perfect, maintaining stability in the world, and in North America, is not premised on "making a better deal".

The US has spent a hundred years working with Canada as a sovereign country, starting when Canadians were first allowed to negotiate a fishing treaty with the US government, in the 1920's.

Since then, both countries have become heavily integrated economically and militarily, though the people are still under two political governments.

This is why North America has been a peaceful place, and not a battleground. Peace and security must come first.

Thus, aiding the balkanization of Canada, could undermine all of North America, within a few generations.

Without peace, stability, and security, making a "better deal" has little merit.

8. "We do not need the US dollar. We can make the Buffalo Dollar!"

True, but the world is currently using USD as the world reserve currency.

Also, after Texas pulled out of Mexico, Texans created the Texas "redback" dollar. After the "redback" dollar collapsed, and was traded at 15 to 1 against USD, it created hardship for the people. The collapse of their dollar actually increased their debt, and further propelled them to seek annexation to the US.

9. "Before we could ever join the US as a state , we would need to engage in decades of full blown nation building, first."

No, in switching teams by joining the US, Alberta would not need to become the jailer, in order to break out of the jail.

Alberta would not need to establish diplomatic and trade relations with its neighbors the US and Canada, and the rest of the world.

Alberta would not need to create a military.

Alberta would not need to create a currency.

Alberta would not need to build embassies around the world.

Alberta would not need to engage in "nation building" in the 21st century.

What would be needed is a legal exit from confederation, and either an application to join the union, or a demand placed upon the US, to join.

Also, in the USA, the "legal exit" that the country is based upon is the Declaration of Independence, according to the rights endowed by the Creator - not by any human king, monarch, or authority.

No need to become the jailer, simply to break out of the jail.
Media TypeFAQ
SourceBen Franklin
Linkhttps://www.facebook.com/groups/boardalberta2usa/?multi_permalinks=502398807805741¬if_id=1615916788493973¬if_t=group_activity&ref=notif
Updated16-03-2021